Amazon Credit Card Approval Odds (Amazon Store Card & Chase Amazon Card)

By Rebecca Anders

Amazon offers two different consumer credit cards from two different credit card issuers. Your odds of being approved for an Amazon credit card are different depending on which card you are talking about as well as on whether you have excellent credit, average credit, or bad credit.

Let’s look at each card and discuss the card’s approval odds:

Amazon Prime Rewards Visa (or Amazon Rewards Visa) from Chase

This Amazon credit card is issued by Chase and offers you rewards with every purchase you make. If you are an Amazon Prime member, you’ll get 5% back in rewards on your Amazon & Whole Foods purchases, 2% at restaurants, gas stations, and drug stores, and then 1% back on everything else. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, the card is mostly the same, except you’ll only get a 3% rebate on those Amazon purchases.

This is the more desirable and generous of the two Amazon credit cards, so there is a higher standard for approval. Chase and Amazon are going to be looking for customers with good-to-excellent credit scores, though average scores may be OK if you have a longer credit history and you’ve handled credit well in the last 3 to 4 years.

So what does all that mean in terms of approval?

  • Credit scores above 750: Odds of approval are very high
  • Credit scores between 700-749: Odds of approval are 65%-75%
  • Credit scores between 650 and 699: Odds of approval are 35%-40%
  • Credit scores below 650: Odds of approval are very low

A question that always comes up when people look at the odds of approval on the Amazon Visa (or any other credit card) is: why do some people get rejected with a higher score while people with a lower score get approved?

The answer is that your overall credit score is not the only factor in the approval decision. Your income and/or monthly expenses can be a factor, the length of your credit history can be a factor, the number of credit cards you’ve applied for in the recent past can be a factor, the amount of debt on your current cards can be a factor, and more. While some of these factors are already part of your credit score, certain card issuers will weigh certain factors more heavily than others.

For example, in the case of the Amazon Visa, Chase is often thought of as a bank that is less likely to work with newer credit card customers, so if your credit history is less than a year old, your score might be OK but your odds of approval would be lower than someone else with the same score but a longer history of credit card use.



Amazon Prime Store Card (or Amazon Store Card) issued by Synchrony Bank

This credit card’s main function is to allow you to finance large Amazon purchases, usually at a 0% interest rate. It is not a rewards card, though Amazon Prime customers who use it will get 5% off of their Amazon purchases. (Not an Amazon Prime customer? You’ll pay full price, sorry.)

The odds of approval on this card are much higher than the odds for the Amazon Rewards Visa from Chase. Synchrony Bank is well-known to approve more customers with lower credit scores than the “big bank” card issuers.

So what does all that mean in terms of approval?

  • Credit scores above 750: Odds of approval are very high
  • Credit scores between 700-749: Odds of approval are 80%-90%
  • Credit scores between 650 and 699: Odds of approval are 60%-70%
  • Credit scores below 650: Odds of approval are 50-50 near 650, lower if your score is lower.